January 2011

Excavation of the garden area of the Deanery at the heart of the Viking triangle of Waterford started in November 2010. The Undercroft was built in the 13th century for the nearby Cathedral and may at one time have been used as a Mint for coin-making.

Finds to date include this 11th century copper alloy ringed pin which was probably used as a cloak fastener as well as many pieces of decorated medieval pottery, a small bone comb and this finely decorated floor tile.

The works are in advance of the construction of a new medieval museum for Waterford City, thanks are due to the City Council for their support.

Apr 2013 Lismullin Monograph

Aidan O ‘Connell of Archer Heritage Planning has written the definitive book about archaeological excavations at Lismullin ceremonial enclosure near Tara in Co. Meath.

The book is called “Harvesting the Stars” and was launched by Sir Barry Cunliffe of Oxford University at the Royal Irish Academy in March 2013. Reviews have been very positive and include;

“This remarkable book will deserve the awards that must surely come its way”

British Archaeology magazine May/June 2013

“It offers an attractive model which will be widely followed and will do much good in bringing archaeology to a demanding public” Sir Barry Cunliffe

 

July 2012 – Butler Gallery

Evans Home on John St in the medieval city of Kilkenny is the site of a new Arts facility to be known as the Butler Gallery. Excavations are revealing some fine medieval remains associated with the priory that once occupied the site.

Jun-Oct 2011

Archer completed a number of road projects for local authorities over the summer including the N59 Sligo, N86 Annascaul to Dingle, N60 Oran Co Roscommon and N51 Drogheda.

Testing on the N60 revealed a significant ecclesiastical site, works on the N86 revealed scattered Bronze Age features which have now been excavated.

June 2012 Update

Road realignment schemes were completed for Louth County Council on the N52 Dundalk to Ardee road and the N2 Emyvale to Monaghan road. The N2 works revealed four Fulachta Fia or cooking pits from the Bronze Age and involved the production of a Laser Scan survey of Tirnaneill Chapel. This was a breakaway Presbyterian meeting house constructed and maintained by a small group of dissenters at the time of the Ulster Synod in 1840.The last baptism in the church took place in 1970 after which it fell into disuse.